FAQ

FAQs

  1. What is a quilt and why do I want one?
  2. What’s wrong with a good, old fashioned sleeping bag?
  3. What size quilt do I need?
  4. What about sleeping pad attachments?
  5. What materials does Noltech use?
  6. How do I choose my insulating material? What is fill power?
  7. What does temperature rating mean? What temperature rating should I get?
  8. Why not just get the warmest possible quilt?
  9. How do I pay with crypto?

1. What is a quilt and why do I want one?

Quilts are most often used by backpackers who sleep in a hammock. Sleeping in a hammock is a great way to guarantee a comfy night’s sleep: you never have to worry about a rock poking you in the back all night! No back pad needed. Then all you need is a tarp to keep the rain off you, and you can skip all that tent business.

But if you’ve only ever napped in a hammock on a hot summer day, it may not have occurred to you that hammock sleepers face a major challenge during backpacking trips: insulation. Without a tent, hammocks are exposed to wind from all sides.

That’s where quilts come in. For insulation against cold and wind, hammock sleepers use a topquilt draped over them inside the hammock like a blanket and an underquilt wrapped around the outside of the hammock like a hotdog bun.  So if you want to sleep in a hammock, you’re going to need to pick up a couple quilts!

Now, you may be thinking to yourself, I’m totally fine sleeping on the ground, thank you very much. That’s cool. Quilts are for ground sleepers, too. Waddaya mean? Just keep reading!


2. What’s wrong with a good, old fashioned sleeping bag?

The topquilt is the smarter alternative to the sleeping bag, and has become an essential in any ultralight backpacker’s sleep system. Topquilts are like sleeping bags, only better.

Insulation works by trapping air in place. But when that insulating material gets compressed, it can’t trap any air, so it loses its ability to insulate. When you lie down in a sleeping bag, that’s exactly what happens: some of that fluffy down that’s supposed to be keeping you warm gets squished between your body and the ground, rendering it totally ineffective.  You could always unzip the sleeping bag, but then you’ve essentially got a blanket that’s way bigger than it needs to be.

This may not seem like a big deal to most people. But to minimalist or ultralight backpackers, this is exactly the type of small stuff we sweat. To carry a sleeping bag stuffed with insulation that doesn’t insulate would be an attack on everything we stand for.

Topquilts, on the other hand, remove all that unnecessary material. They save space in your pack, save weight on your back, and — most importantly — save money in your wallet!


3. What size quilt do I need?


4. What about sleeping pad attachments?

As a hammock camper, I have very little experience using these quilts on the ground, as such I have not developed pad attachments yet. I am ALWAYS willing to work with my customers to develop new products and to improve what I currently offer. If you would like to have pad attachments added to your quilt please contact me directly and we can work out a solution to fit your needs!


5. What materials does Noltech use?

Our quilts are made with “Membrane 10,” which is an ultralight 10 denier taffeta nylon from Ripstop By The Roll. At 0.66 oz/yd2, we feel that 10 denier strikes the perfect balance between being durable and being lightweight.

We use two different sources for insulation. If you choose 850, 900 and 950 fill-power goose down, your quilt will be stuffed with “HyperDRY” down from Allied Feather & Down, which is water resistant and Responsible Down Standard (RDS) certified. If you choose synthetic insulation, you’ll get Climashield APEX, which weighs in at 5 oz/yd2 and has an Iclo value of 0.82 oz/yd2—it really can’t be beat!


6. How do I choose my insulating material? What is fill power?

Well, it depends what you value most in your quilt. Like many things in life, insulation is “pick two out of three variables” kind of game. In our case, insulation materials can only posses two of the three following qualities: lightweight, warm, and inexpensive.

Do you want a quilt that’s warm and inexpensive? It’s not going to be all that lightweight. Want it cheap and lightweight? It’ll be tough to make it all that warm. Lightweight and warm? Probably not cheap.

Luckily for you, we’ve provided you with several options so you can balance these three variables according to your priorities. In order of ascending warmth and temperature, you can choose between synthetic down and 850, 900 and 950 fill-power goose down.

Fill power (FP) is a standardized measure of fluffiness or “loft” of a down, which is indicative if the down’s insulating efficiency. Given equal quantities, a down with a higher FP will keep you warmer than a down of lower FP. Another way of looking at it is that if you need to get to a certain level of warmth, it takes less of a high FP down to get you to there.

The best insulator we use is 900 FP down: its loft is virtually unrivaled. You don’t need very much of this stuff to keep you warm, so if ultralight gear is your goal, 900 FP is the way to go. This is our Mercedes Benz of down insulation.

On the other end of the spectrum, synthetic down is the cheapest and least effective insulating material. It’s best for summer months when you don’t need much insulation, or for backpackers on a budget who don’t mind a little extra weight in their packs. To continue that car analogy, synthetic insulation is like a used Jeep Wrangler: it’s not ultra-luxurious, but in the summer it’s a whole lot of fun.

If want the best of both worlds, you might want to go with 850 or 900 FP down. While not as quite efficient as 900 FP, these middle-of-the-road choices provide excellent value considering how well they insulate and how lightweight they are. The 850 and 900 FP downs are the equivalents of a Toyota or a Honda sedan: efficient and reliable, but they won’t break the bank.


7. What does temperature rating mean? What temperature rating should I get?

That depends on the lowest temperature on the forecast for the duration of your trip.

The temperature rating of a quilt tells you the lowest air temperature that it can handle — approximately. In other words, the average person using an average sleeping pad and wearing average long underwear should find that a quilt rated at 40°F should be useable down to 40°F, but no colder than that.

A lower temperature rating makes for a warmer quilt; if it’s 45°F out, a quilt rated to 0°F will feel much warmer than a quilt rated to 30°F, although both should have no problem getting the job done. That being said, we recommend using a quilt with a temperature rating at least one level below the lowest temperature you expect to face — forecasts are never 100% certain, and a good night’s sleep is something you never want to risk when backpacking.

For example, if the forecast says to expect a low of 30°F, we’d recommend bringing quilts rated to 10°F or 15°F. Of course, temperature ratings are estimates. If you’re a particularly cold sleeper or if you prefer to sleep without long underwear, you might even want to bring a 0°F quilt for a low of 30°F.


8. Why not just get the warmest possible quilt?

Well, two reasons: cost and weight.

The temperature rating is controlled by the amount of insulating material stuffed into the quilt: the more insulation, the warmer the quilt. You’re going to have to pay for that extra insulation and then you’re going to have to carry it around with you. A size medium top quilt filled with synthetic down rated to 0°F weighs more than triple that of the same quilt rated to 50°F.

Of course, you can mitigate some of that weight penalty by upgrading to a more efficient down. For example, a size medium 0F topquilt filled with synthetic down weighs just over 37 ounces, while the same quilt with 850 FP goose down weighs around 23 ounces, despite keeping you just as warm. If you upgrade to 950 FP down, you’ll shave another couple ounces off that total weight.


9. How do I pay with crypto?

If you would like to pay for your order with Bitcoin, proceed with the order as normal and select the Bitcoin payment option. After you fill out the required information click “Continue to Payment” and then select the Bitcoin tab.

to use Nano, use Raipay and for Ethereum select the “Pay with Ether” option.